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Health and Wellness

Spotlight of Rose and Honeysuckle – June’s Birth Flowers

The language of flowers, or floriography, has been used around the world for centuries.  It’s a way of communicating emotions or sentiment through plants, flowers or floral arrangements. If you’ve ever given someone flowers, you’ve engaged in floriography without realizing it!

What are June’s birth flowers?

Over time as floriography developed, each month was assigned a flower, and anyone born in that month would inherit the characteristics of what those flowers symbolize. Here’s what June’s birth flowers, rose and honeysuckle, represent.

Rose birth flower

When you think of a rose, you usually think of a long-stemmed red rose symbolizing love, but did you know that the various colors of roses have more nuanced meaning?

  • White roses convey purity, new beginnings, and eternity
  • Pink roses symbolize sweetness, elegance, and femininity
  • Yellow roses signify friendship and warmth
  • Blue roses represent mystery, intrigue and new, unknown adventures
  • Purple roses, the “mystical” rose, indicate your deep respect for someone
  • Peach roses convey modesty, sincerity, and gratitude
  • Orange roses represent desire, energy, and enthusiasm
  • Multi-colored roses mean fun and celebration

Honeysuckle birth flower

Although the scientific name, Lonicera japonica, originates from a famous botanist, Adam Lonicer, honeysuckle gets its common name from the way hummingbirds “suckle” its sweet blossoms. It represents everlasting happiness, love, and sweetness. Because honeysuckle clings to walls and is extremely hardy and notoriously difficult to eradicate if left unchecked, it can also symbolize everlasting devotion and affection.

What is the history of rose use?

People have held roses in high regard since ancient times. Nomadic tribes planted them along their routes and Cleopatra had her rooms filled with rose petals so when Marc Antony visited, he would remember her every time he smelled a rose thereafter.  It worked. Such is the power of the rose fragrance!

During the Middle Ages the rose was thought to cure various illnesses. In modern times, hybrid roses have been cultivated for culinary or gardening use. Today more than 10,000 types of roses grow throughout the world.

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What are the uses of honeysuckle historically (essential oils)?

The sweet-smelling honeysuckle includes deciduous and evergreen types and range in color from white to red. An ornamental plant that can quickly dominate the landscape, honeysuckle also has a history of medicinal use. During the Middle Ages European herbalists used it for general cleansing, respiratory conditions, digestive problems, rashes, and sores. Today you commonly find honeysuckle as a floral oil used in aromatherapy to evoke summertime feelings.

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How to make the most of June

Summer’s here with long warm days. Make the most of June with these ideas:

  • Clean out the basement or garage of clutter
  • Toss or donate unneeded items
  • Plant your vegetable or flower garden
  • Make a pest control plan since this is the time of year, they come alive
  • Dress up your deck with new cushions, potted plants, or rug
  • Have a yard sale while the kids sell lemonade
  • Store winter items in vacuum-sealed bags to save space
  • Go on a picnic, read a book in the shade, and enjoy life

List of birth months and flowers

  • January: Carnation and Snowdrop
  • February: Violet and Primrose
  • March: Daffodil and Jonquil
  • April: Daisy and Sweet Pea
  • May: Lily of the Valley and Hawthorn
  • June: Rose and Honeysuckle
  • July: Larkspur and Water Lily
  • August: Gladiolus and Poppy
  • September: Aster and Morning Glory
  • October: Marigold and Cosmos
  • November: Chrysanthemum
  • December: Narcissus and Holly

Botanic Choice offers an array of Floral and Essential Oils for many occasions. Check them out today!

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Individual results may vary.

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